Research Grant

Guidelines for Research Grants for IASA Members

  1. The aim of the IASA Research Grant is to encourage research and publication on audiovisual archiving by supporting some or all of the project costs. Research can, but need not, form part of an academic programme. The level of financial support will be determined by the Executive Board individually on a case by case basis, but individual awards will not normally exceed Euro 2,000. All costs are eligible if the applicant can show clear justification for them within the scope, aims and purposes of the project.
  2. IASA will only consider applications from IASA Members whose membership is in good standing at the time of application.
  3. IASA will support a research project only if there is evidence that the results are within the scope of IASA's purposes. See these at http://www.iasa-web.org/iasa-constitution
  4. Depending on the scope and the overall duration of a research project, the applicant should arrange appropriately defined project phases. Interim reports should be sent to IASA at the end of each phase. A final report must be submitted no later than 2 months following the end of the project.
  5. IASA will issue a Research Grant on the basis of a written agreement signed by the Secretary-General for the Association. The terms of payment (including the method of payment and to whom monies should be paid) will be included in the written agreement in the context of the available budget as set by the Executive Board.
  6. The recipient will acknowledge IASA in all papers, discussions etc.
  7. IASA will not pay Research Grants in advance of a project
  8. To apply, click here (IASA members only)

February 2014, 5th revision
 


Research Grant recipients


 

Title: Pilot Project in Re-Study and Repatriation of the International Library of African Music (ILAM) Hugh Tracey Field Recordings

Grantee: Diane Thram, ILAM, Grahamstown


 

Title: Historic Pricing Analysis for Digitization of AV

Grantee: Chris Lacinak, AV Preserve, New York


Title: Memoria, Derechos Humanos y construcción de ciudadanía en localidades socialmente periféricas de la región centro este de la Provincia de Santa Cruz” [“Memory, Human Rights and construction of citizenship in socially peripheral towns in the east central region of the Province of Santa Cruz”]

Grantee: Gustavo Urbano Navarro, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Argentina

Timeframe: 2013

The South Patagonian region has a particular social structure. Since the first decades of 20th Century, where there was immigration from many parts of the world - firstly, Welsh, English, Spanish and Italian, and later, from the poorest European countries- Poland, Bulgaria, Lithuania, Yugoslavia, Ukrainian and Arabic countries. These immigrants arrived gradually and got integrated to the community. Since the end of 20TH century until now it is receiving an increasing Bolivian and Paraguayan immigration, working in petroleum and mines.
South Patagonia has a history full of conflicts, crossed by processes of domination and resistance, genocides and union struggles. These were silenced by national and foreign media, and in recent decades, are beginning to be recovered by those who undertook the generation of Just Memory policy.
During recent  years, links between history and memory has occupied a prevailing place, with regard to the central axes where the recovery of subjectivity was articulated, that is, the assessment of the subject’s viewpoint and the consideration of popular sectors as agents of historical processes, and the concept of history as speech or narrative.

On one hand, local municipal libraries count on documentary material, most of which is going through a deterioration process on account of lack of financing for the maintenance and sustainability of preservation projects. On the other hand, many of the existing documentary sources, such as the local press, suit only the “official history” being insufficient without the testimony from its protagonists (oral recording) and the material from private recordings. It is through the written support that history and culture of victors and domineering people prevail, ignoring the voice of the defeated and silenced. The oral tradition acts as the only element for the generation to generation transmission keeping a huge historical and cultural heritage, made up by individual and group ideas, testimonies and experiences. Due to its value, oral tradition is increasingly regarded as an intangible cultural heritage which includes diversity, minorities and threatened voices.

The objective of this project was to engineer, by to use the different actors of local communities, the collective construction of an open access web portal for the recovery and preservation of their social memory and the diffusion using open software technologies.
Results at: http://www.koluel.org/
 


Title: Survey of audiovisual collections in memory and cultural heritage repositories in a frontier town : a case study of Lucas do Rio Verde, Mato Grosso, Brazil

Grantee: Bertram Lyons

Timeframe: March to December 2011

The researcher will conduct a survey of memory institutions in Lucas do Rio Verde, a frontier town in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso founded in 1982 and built up primarily by Brazilian families of German and Italian heritage. The survey will develop baseline data on the types and extent of memory resources that exist in the town, especially those of an audiovisual nature. This survey will capture information about the history and ongoing management of each institution, including funding, management, facilities, practices, audience, mission, and long-term planning. It will also document the nature of the institutions’ audiovisual holdings and the ways in which these holdings are used and accessed by local and external communities. Interviews with key individuals in institutions, as private collectors and as community members will be recorded and/or transcribed.

These combined results from the survey of Lucas’ network of memory institutions will provide a snapshot of Lucas’ audiovisual cultural heritage and memory resources in 2011 and will reveal new insights into the development of memory institutions in developing communities in an increasingly digital era.


Title: Archiving the music world

Grantee: World and Traditional Music, British Library (Janet Topp Fargion)

Timeframe: January to December 1999

Archiving the music world was a joint project between the World and Traditional Music section of the British Library and Music for Change, a charitable organisation working to support community music projects throughout the world. The project aimed to compile a database of collections of recorded music throughout the world, to highlight their existence, condition, status, accessibility and plans for preservation. It focussed primarily on countries where formal structures for the preservation of sound recordings were relatively new or non-existent, where resources and expertise were scarce and existing collections were in danger of being lost. The printed report documents 117 institutions and private collections from 66 countries in Africa, Latin America, Asia, Australia & Oceania, and Eastern Europe.